Magic Spell

Animal Companion (Druid Spell) and Familiar Bond (Wizard Spell) (DnD 5e)

Animal Companion

2nd-Level Enchantment (Ritual)

  • Casting Time: 1 Day
  • Range: 20 Feet
  • Components: V, S, M (100sp of Charcoal, Herbs, and Incense that must be consumed in a fire)
  • Duration: Instantaneous

The Druid gains the companionship of a Beast of no more than CR½ that is present during the course of the ritual, popular animal choices include, but are not limited to, Black Bears, Boars, Deer, Hawks, Owls, Panthers, Ravens, and Wolves. A Druid of 11th level of greater may gain the companionship of a Beast up to CR1.

The Druid may speak with their animal companion at all times in a way similar to the Speak with Animals spell (q.v.)

The animal companion acts independently of the Druid and is a “boon companion” rather than a familiar or other similar spirit aide. In combat it rolls its own initiative and takes its own actions. The animal companion gains hit dice such that it always has the same number of hit dice as their Druid companion, and they are allowed either Ability Score Improvements or Feats at the same time as their Druids gain the same improvement. Their proficiency score is always equal to that of their Druid, and they may use the Druid’s Intelligence and Wisdom saves instead of their own

The animal companion remains with the Druid until death or until it is released – while amazingly hale and hearty it’s lifespan is not greater than that of its wilder brethren. Released companions often stay near to Druidic places of Power and act as guardians as the Druids take care of them in their final years. Additionally, nothing prevents a Druid from Awakening (q.v.) an Animal Companion – often making these guardians quite dangerous.

A Druid may only have one Animal Companion at a time.

 

Familiar Bond

2nd-Level Enchantment (Ritual)

  • Casting Time: 8 Hours
  • Range: 10 Feet
  • Components: V, S, M (30sp of Charcoal, Herbs, and Incense that must be consumed in a fire in a brazier)
  • Duration: Instantaneous

Unlike the 1st-Level Find Familiar (q.v.) which summons a spiritual “Fetch” to aid the magic user, the spell Familiar Bond creates an oath-bound alliance between the Wizard and an allied creature. Often performed with infant animals (or possibly with the animals parents in some cases), the spell creates an intense bond that cannot be broken save by either the violation of the agreement by the Wizard – these creatures rarely exceed CR½. In exceedingly rare cases, bonds may even be formed with Fey, Celestials, or Fiends if the Wizard can contact appropriately powerful entities from the appropriate Court to negotiate with – these creatures can be CR1 or possibly even higher if the oath’s are worthy of it.

The Familiar rolls its own initiative and takes its own actions. The hit dice of the Familiar is always at least equal to their Wizard, and the Familiar may always use the Wizards proficiency bonus as well. If the Wizards saves are better the Familiar may also substitute those saves for their own. The Familiar also gains Ability Score improvements and Feats at the same time as their Wizard.

The Wizard may communicate telepathically with the Familiar if they within 100 feet of each other, and they may also, as an Action, “ride along” with one or more senses of their Familiar (being oblivious to their own matching sense at while doing so).

The Familiar can maintain Concentration for one spell that the Wizard has cast as long as they are within 100 feet of the caster. The Familiar may act as the “point of origin” for purposes of range for the Wizard as long as they are within 100 feet.

If the Familiar takes damage, the Wizard takes an equal amount of Psychic damage (that bypasses any Resistance or Immunity). The Wizard is also Stunned for one round (Charisma Save, DC15, for no effect). If the Familiar is reduced to zero hit points then the Wizard immediately takes Psychic damage equal to the Familiar’s Hit Points (Charisma Save, DC15, Half Damage, other bypassing any Resistance or Immunity). They are also automatically Stunned for one round. Both Wizard and Familiar have Advantage on Death Saves while the other is still alive. If the Familiar is slain, the Wizard is affected as if by a Feeblemind spell (DC10+ Familiar’s Hit Dice).

A Wizard may only have one Familiar at a time, though they may also have a Fetch as summoned by the 1st-Level Find Familiar spell.

 

NOTE: Yes, a multi-classed Druid/Warlock/Wizard could have an Animal Companion, a Pact of the Chain Familiar, a Fetch, and a Familiar. If they were also a Ranger with the Beast Master Archtype they could also have Ranger’s Companion as well.

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Death and the Player Character (5E DnD)

So, as I study for the EPPP, part of my brain recovery (or cushioning more likely) has been watching Matthew Colville’s Running the Game series and the odd video or three from Web DM. I strongly recommend both sets of videos, for a variety of reasons – you can decide on your own. Now, that said, this has more to do with the recent release of Matt Mercer’s Resurrection rules from Critical Whatever. I don’t watch it, but the rules came across my feed.

It force me to think about this in my game, as well as reflecting on some of the differences between 1E and 5E. In the old 1E games, things were much more lethal, and characters were a bit more careful as result. In 5E, healing is much more available, dying is much harder (mechanically), and there are none of the limitations or costs on Raising that previously existed (System Shocks, Con loss, racial limitations). We are finally at the level where Raise Dead is available (or will be soon) and while I like the idea of Matt Mercer’s rules they are just way to fiddly in some ways. 5E DnD has done a lot to get rid of fiddly in some ways and his rules actually seem more fiddly than 1E AD&D was.

I’ve also been thinking about simply how easy it is to bring back people from death or it’s brink in 5E. I like this flavor to tell the truth, but the Gentle Repose and Revivify combo is a, um, “killer” on top of the normal magical curing, healing kits, and Spare the Dying cantrip. It is really pretty darn hard to die and they’ve made it pretty darn easy to come back from it…

Perhaps too easy for my evolved campaign setting.

Now, one suggestion is to make diamonds (the material component for Revivify, Raise Dead, Resurrection, and True Resurrection) much less common and very difficult to find. Truthfully, I already know exactly had rare they are and they already aren’t that common. But I also don’t exactly mind Revivify given the time limitations involved. I do miss the System Shock rolls of the old Raise Dead spells, as well as the racial limitations – these are huge social and cultural limiting factors in my campaign.

Note, this is also all in my search to re-humanize my world a bit. It is intended to be humanocentric world, and there is no mechanical reason for this in 5E unlike the reasons why this would be in 1E.

So, normal rules of dealing with near death still apply. Dropping to 0HP is just like the rules. Healing from that works as normal and Revivify works as normal. A Saving Throw on the part of the character being brought back from death is required for Gentle Repose + Revivify, Raise Dead, and Resurrection. There is no Saving Throw needed for True Resurrection or Reincarnate. For purposes of effects, any time you are Revivified outside of the base timing of the spell because of some other spell or magic item in the mix, you need to make the Ability Check.

The ability that the Ability Check is rolled on is chosen by the player of the character being brought back as long as they can justify it. The Ability Check is Medium (15), using Bywater-grade diamonds (basically industrial quality) incurs Disadvantage, while 1st Water diamonds grant Advantage. For what it is worth, Bywater is pretty much all that is available in Towns (and probably only enough for one casting of Revivify) while 2nd and 3rd Water are available Cities, and 1st Water diamonds are generally only available (at normal price) in Great Cities.

Things that normally affect Ability Checks will also affect this one – meaning that a group of companions pleading with their deities, cleansing the area spiritually, calling out psychically to help the spirit find it’s way to the body, whatever, can potentially help this roll (see p175 “Working Together” in the Player’s Handbook).

Jewelry with an appropriately-sized diamond in it is very “fashionable” for many adventurers and usually able to be found in most cities.

In the realm of verisimilitude and Gygaxian Naturalism, these sorts of spells also incurs a significant bit of interest in a divine caster’s deity, even if unconscious. So bringing character back from death that do not worship the same deity, are of significant different alignments, etc., etc., etc. can have significant repercussions for everyone involved. Geasa, religious conversion, spell refusal/failure, and the like are all possible and should be expected. This is beyond how some cultures and races view and deal with death. For example, Dwarves can be Raised, but culturally are loath to come back and see it as a curse rather than a blessing. There is also, invariably, some other cost to coming back from the dead – ability score penalty, insanity, whatever. It really depends upon the situation and context – hacked to death by swords is a bit more traumatic than a quiet backstab that killed someone instantly, but assume that dying is troubling to the emotional well-being of a character and even their spiritual health.

I’m slowly updating the write-ups of the character races with their relationship with death.

TTFN!

D.

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Investiture of Water (5e)

Investiture of Water

6th Level Transmutation

  • Casting Time: 1 Action
  • Range: Self
  • Components: VS
  • Duration: Concentration, up to 10 Minutes

Until the spell ends, water drips from the caster’s body and they stand in a small pool of water. The casters gains the following benefits:

  • They are Resistant to Fire and Acid
  • The caster may breath underwater and may Swim their normal Movement speed.
  • The caster may use their Action to raise a mist that creates Light or Heavy Obscurement as the caster choose (Reaction to change).
  • The caster may use their Action to transform themselves into water, fluid and amorphous. They have a Speed of 20, and are Immune to Melee or Missile damage in this form. They may not cast spells in this form.
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When Mage Armor and Shield simply isn’t enough… (5e)

These are two of the more ubiquitous spells for Wizards, found in many codices and grimoires across the Mortal Realm. Even if not found within a wizard’s current codex, they are often among the first researched, begged, borrowed, or stolen as they advance in level.


Journeyman’s Hauberk

3rd-Level Abjuration (Ritual)

  • Casting Time: 5 Minutes
  • Range: Self
  • Components: VSM (100sp of Diamond Dust))
  • Duration: 7 Days

Perhaps one of the most ubiquitous of spells for the adventuring mage, Journeyman’s Hauberk sits firmly between spells like Mage Armor and Shield, and Mantle or Master’s Lorica as a standby of personal protection and utility. The spell has the following properties:

  • Grants a benefit of +4 to Armor Class
  • Provides a phantom 15 Hit Points, that absorbs or ablates damage.
    • If these Phantom Hit Points run out, the spell is dispelled.
  • The bearer of the spell benefits from a Protection from Evil enchantment
  • Absorbs Force damage
    • This damage “recharges” the phantom hit points granted by the armour at a 2:1 ratio.
  • The bearer of the spell has Advantage to all Saving Throws
  • Allows the bearer of the spell to Detect Magic by touch
  • Allows the bearer of the spell to Detect Illusion by touch

This spell is notable in that it requires a rather unique and unalterable material component that is perhaps its sole restriction on use by many mages, and that is 100sp worth of Diamond Dust is needed for each casting. The spell itself produces no visible effect (unlike, say, Phantom Armour) but it’s effects can clearly be seen or perceived by others when they come into play.  No other spells of a similar nature (Mage Armor, Protection from Energy, etc) can be used while this spell is in effect. The spell cannot be Dispelled, nor is it removed by Globes of Invulnerability, and is generally only able to be removed by actual anti-magical effects.

At Higher Levels: When the spell is cast using a spell slot of 4th level of higher it last for an additional day and has an additional 5 phantom hit points, for each spell slot above 3rd that is used.


Master’s Lorica

6th-Level Abjuration (Ritual)

  • Casting Time: 5 Minutes
  • Range: Self
  • Components: VSM (100sp worth each of Diamond, Sapphire, Emerald, and Amethyst Dust)
  • Duration: 7 Days

An advancement and a refinement of the Journeyman’s Hauberk spell, Master’s Lorica as a standby of personal protection and utility, for Master-class mages. It is often considered a far more useful spell than Mantle given it’s simplicity and blanket protections. The spell has the following properties:

  • Grants a benefit of +7 to Armor Class
    • The bearer is also Immune to non-Enchanted weapons.
    • The bearer has Resistance to Slashing, Piercing, & Bludgeoning Damage
  • Provides a phantom 30 Hit Points, that absorbs or ablates damage.
    • If these Phantom Hit Points run out, the spell is dispelled.
    • The bearer may spend 1d4 of these phantom Hit Points to Dispel Magic on single enchantment by touch
  • The bearer of the spell benefits from a Protection from Evil enchantment
  • Absorbs Force damage.
    • This damage “recharges” the phantom hit points granted by the armour at a 2:1 ratio.
  • The bearer of the spell has Resistance to Fire, Cold, Thunder, and Lightning.
  • The bearer of the spell has Advantage to all Saving Throws
  • Allows the bearer of the spell to Detect Magic by touch
  • Allows the bearer of the spell to Detect Illusion by touch

Much like Journeyman’s Hauberk, the Master’s Lorica requires unalterable material components that is perhaps the sole restriction on use by many mages, and that is 100sp worth each of Diamond, Sapphire, Emerald, and Amethyst Dust is needed for each casting. The spell itself produces no visible effect (unlike, say, Phantom Armour) but it’s effects can clearly be seen or perceived by others when they come into play. No other spells of a similar nature (Mage Armor, Protection from Energy, etc) can be used while this spell is in effect. The spell cannot be Dispelled, nor is it removed by Globes of Invulnerability, and is generally only able to be removed by actual anti-magical effects.

At Higher Levels: When the spell is cast using a spell slot of 7th level of higher it last for an additional week and has an additional 10 phantom hit points, for each spell slot above 6th that is used.

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Spells of the Cherev Enoch (5e)

Blaze

1st Level Evocation

  • Casting Time: 1 Action
  • Range: None
  • Components: VS
  • Duration: Special

With this spell the mage raises a hand and invokes the Lords of Light, bringing forth a blazing white light that blinds all creatures (including the caster) for 1d6 rounds (Dexterity save for none, caster with Advantage). The spell also does 2d6 points of Radiant damage, to all undead and evil spirits within the area of effect, Constitution save for half damage. The light, not blinding or damaging, lingers for one round per three levels of the caster, slowly fading as it expires. If the caster is not an Initiate of the Society of Light then creatures have Advantage on their Saves.

At Higher Levels: When the spell is cast using a spell slot of 2nd level or higher, the damage increases by 1d6 damage for each slot level above 1st.

It is commonly found in the Cherev Enoch.


 

Blade of Light

2nd Level Conjuration

  • Casting Time: 1 Action
  • Range: Touch
  • Components: VSM
  • Duration: 2 Strikes or 4 Rounds, whichever comes first.

This spell is cast upon the caster’s sword or dagger (commonly the mage’s kris) and increases the base damage by 1d10 Radiant Damage, Constitution save for half the entire damage rolled. The weapon is considered Enchanted for the duration of the spell. Undead and evil spirits have Disadvantage on their save. In the event that this spell is cast without the material component (the sword or dagger) the duration is halved. If the caster is not an Initiate of the Society of Light then the weapon used is destroyed when the spell ends.

At Higher Levels: When the spell is cast using a spell slot of 3rd level or higher, the damage increases by 1d10 damage, an additional strike is allowed, and the potential duration is extended for two round, for each slot level above 2nd.

It is commonly found in the Cherev Enoch.


Spiritual Blade 

5th-Level Evocation

  • Casting Time: 1 Action
  • Range: 30′
  • Components: VSM
  • Duration: Special

This spell is similar in effect to the Priests Spiritual Weapon spell, but it is significantly more versatile and powerful. The mage may choose one of four effects when casting the spell:

  1. The caster selects a single target within range. The spell lasts for five rounds, and is able to strike once per round (as the caster), for 1d8 Force damage, plus Spellcasting Modifier.
  2. The caster selects five targets within range. The spell is instantaneous, and each target is struck once, as above.
  3. The caster selects a single target within range. The spell is instantaneous, and strikes a single time, as above, save the damage is 5d8 Force Damage
  4. The caster casts the spell upon an actual sword that they then wield, this sword is then considered Enchanted, does an additional +1d8 Force damage per strike, and the spell lasts either five rounds or five strikes, whichever comes first.

At Higher Levels: When the spell is cast using a spell slot of 6th level or higher it has the following effects depending on the version of the spell chosen to cast.

  1. The spell lasts for an additional round for each spell slot above 5th that is used.
  2. An additional target may be chosen for each spell slot above 5th that is used.
  3. The spell does an additional 1d8 Force damage for each spell slot above 5th that is used
  4. The spell does an additional 1d8 Force damage, gains an additional strike, and the potential duration is extended one round, for each spell slot above 5th that is used.

This spell is a favorite of mages who belong to the Society of Light, being found in the Cherev Enoch, though the Grey Elves have their own version as well that supplements their puissant combat magics. It should be noted that the spell is not unique to the Society or the Grey Elves.


Sword of Light

7th Level Conjuration

  • Casting Time: 1 Action
  • Range: Touch
  • Components: VSM
  • Duration: 6 Strikes or 12 Rounds, whichever comes first.

This spell is cast upon the caster’s sword or dagger (commonly the mage’s kris) and increases the base damage by 6d10 Radiant damage, Constitution save for half the entire damage rolled. The weapon is considered Enchanted for the duration of the spell. Undead and evil spirits have Disadvantage on their save, and creatures struck are also subject to Banishment as the 4th level Mage spell. In the event that this spell is cast without the material component (the sword or dagger) the duration is halved. If the caster is not an Initiate of the Society of Light then the weapon used is destroyed when the spell ends and the targets have Advantage on their saves against the effects.

At Higher Levels: When the spell is cast using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the damage increases by 1d10 damage, an additional strike is allowed, and the potential duration is extended two rounds, for each slot level above 7th

It is commonly found in the Cherev Enoch.

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Familiars and more for Wizards

Anyone else notice that they really nerfed Familiars in 5e?

I mean, on the one hand, they did utterly remove the whole “you’re screwed if your familiar dies” thing to compensate, but at the same time Familiars are now pretty much almost as worthless as the canon 1e version. I’d always been looking for ways to beef up Mages in 1e to make up for their generally “glass peashooter” nature at low levels that might actually work up to an actual glass cannon if they were lucky.

So Familiars were beefed up and casting the spell was essentially considered a “essential part” of an apprentice mage’s training, material components were tweaked (essentially making Arcane Focus), I ruled that spells could be cast directly from spellbooks with a longer casting time (aka 5e Rituals) and the proper equipment, and I added the idea of Grimoires (instructional spellbooks with “standard spells” that were easy to get ahold of) to the setting.

But as I look at 5e, I’m really underwhelmed with how Familiars work. Rituals, while fantastic, are simultaneously too easy to cast while at the same time being kind of useless because there are barely any spells with the Ritual tag. Learning spells is amazingly easy, but there seems to be little or no control on what spells get learned – plus the whole quest to find a “lost spellbook” is relatively “meh” because Wizards already gain lots of (unrestricted) spells as they advance.

I’ll get to Rituals, Arcane Foci, and Grimoires for 5e in a bit, at the moment I want to look at Familiars.

My game has a long history of really fun familiars – Edgar the Raven, Fafnir the Dragonet, She-Who-Chases-After-Rabbits-And-Runs-Into-Trees (aka “Rabbit”) the wolf, Asket the Frakir, the Ring of Ashkhelion, Elhiehu the Guardian Spirit, and many more besides. They can quickly become an active and engaged NPC/Ally/Henchman that builds a lot of color into the story, but mostly by being an active resource. 5e seems to have dropped this idea and instead moved to “flavor text for a couple of permanent magical effects” that are worthless the minute those big area effect spells start getting dropped.

So here is my very simple proposal to wrench Wizard (and Warlock) Familiars back into something more relevant.

  • Familiars gain 1HD for each level of the pacted Wizard or Warlock.
  • Familiars act independently of the Wizard or Warlock, including the ability to attack.
  • When the Wizard or Warlock is granted a Ability Score Improvement/Feat Gain, the Familiar may also take one (it does not have to be the same as their Wizard/Warlock’s). Alternately they can gain some other ability with the agreement of the DM.
  • A Familiar can, by proxy, maintain Concentration for one spell.
  • A Familiar uses the Proficiency Modifier of their pacted Wizard or Warlock instead of their own.
  • A Mage or Warlock may, as a Reflexive Action, choose to take on any damage that their Familiar would suffer, less one point (that the Familiar must suffer – with the effects described below).
  • When a Familiar takes damage, the Wizard or Warlock takes an equal amount of Psychic Damage. The Wizard or Warlock is Stunned for 1 round (Charisma Save for No Effect, DC15).
  • If a Familiar is “slain” the Wizard or Warlock takes Psychic Damage equal to the Hit Points of the Familiar (Charisma Save for Half Damage, DC15). The Wizard or Warlock is automatically Stunned for 1 Round.

Let me know what you think! This seems relatively balanced to me, though certainly with the potential to be abused in either direction – but my goal is not to “prevent abuse” but to instead “promote roleplaying and fun.”

TTFN!

D.

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Is it just me..? (Wish in 5e)

So, in my quest to figure out how high-level characters can engage in wholesale carnage and slaughter (and yes, 40d6 from a Meteor Swarm is quite decent) I happened to look at the Wish spell.

WTF?

  1. Duplicate any 8th level or lower spell – check.
  2. List of clearly spelled out non-spell duplicating effects – no problem.
  3. Obligatory, the DM can let you do anything you want if they want to, but it might screw you if you try it – duh.

And then we get down to the last paragraph.

The stress of casting this spell to produce any effect other than duplicating another spell weakens you. After enduring that stress, each time you cast a spell until you finish a long rest, you take 1d10 Necrotic damage per level of the spell. This damage can’t be reduced or prevented in any way.

Ok, seems kind of harsh for the ability to “downgrade” a 9th level spell into an 8th or lower spell (even if it is potentially a non-Wizard spell) in the 5e spell slot mechanic, but, well, ok. I guess. But let’s continue.

 In addition, your Strength drops to 3, if it isn’t 3 or lower already, for 2d4 days. For each of those days that you spend resting and doing nothing more than light activity, your remaining recovery time decreases by 2 days.

Ok, so in addition to being useless as a spellcaster for the “rest of the day” you are also essentially useless physically. Sure, I can run with this, even if it seems like insult on top of injury. But wait, there’s more…

Finally, there is a 33 percent chance that you are unable to cast wish ever again in you suffer this stress.

Let’s just write that again so we are clear:

There is a 33 percent chance that you are unable to cast wish ever again in you suffer this stress.

WTF?

So, in a game where I can pretty much memorize anything thing I might want to cast, unless I use what is theoretically my gamechanger, my single most powerful spell, the single most powerful spell in the game, to do something that I already innately do (unlike every other edition) there is a One-in-Three chance that I will never be able to cast this spell again? That’s in addition to being all but useless until I can get a full night’s sleep.

I am kind of hoping that there is a missing sentence in there somewhere. A Saving Throw to make, a clarification that “Category 2” Wish‘s (see above) count as “spell duplication”, something… Because otherwise the opportunity risk/cost of using a Wish is far too high, and it moves from the category of “super-utility” spell and into a some other netherworld of arcane magic that is great, as long as you never count on doing it again – so make sure it’s worth it!

Teleport the entire party in flash to escape the dragon? 1/3 chance to never cast another Wish.

Cast a “Tempest Cloud” instead of a “Incendiary Cloud” because the monster is vulnerable to Lightning and immune to Fire? 1/3 chance to never cast another Wish.

Especially when compared to the new Divine Intervention rules for Clerics, this seems so out of whack.

Please tell me they are going to Errrata this…

TTFN!

D.

 

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A Pair of Different Banquet… (Module X2 – Castle Amber)

I realized that there was the chance that the party would return to the banquet, especially if there were new characters around. So I decided to make up a couple of new banquets so that they could be sure what might occur if they ate the food – though with a couple of identical items.

1st Course:

—Seafood Bisque: Save vs. Spells: If failed; the character gains permanent Water Breathing. If succeed then there is no effect.

—Amber Wine: Duplicates the effects from the module.

2nd Course:

—Watercress Salad: Save vs. Spells: If fail, the character will needs only a tenth the normal nourishment. If succeed there is no effect.

3rd Course:

—Wild Rice and Cranberries: There is no effect.

—Roast Duck: Save vs Spells: If fail, the character floats on water and cannot sink. If succeed then there is no effect.

—Fingerling Carrots: Save vs. Polymorph, if failed males are transformed into women, if female gain +1d4 Comeliness (and a much more sevelt figure with a larger bust). If succeed then there is no effect.

—Dark Red Wine: This wine causes magical drunkeness for 2-12 turns. Save vs. Poison, if succeed there is no further effect. If failed, the character is -2/-10% to all actions due to a permenant hangover.

4th Course:

—Rasberry-Chocolate Torte: Save vs. Polymorph, if the save is failed, the character triples in weight bursting out of the seams of the clothes and armour (damage as lycanthropic transformation). If the save is made nothing happens.

—Brandy: Duplicates the effects from the module.

———————————————————————————————————————–

1st Course:

—Gazpacho : Save vs. Poison: If fail; gains the ability to remain conscious at negative Hit Points. If succeed then there is no effect.

—Amber Wine: Duplicates the effects from the module.

2nd Course:

—Cucumber and Dill Salad: This course has no effect, though it is delicious.

3rd Course:

—Garlic Bread: Save vs. Spells, if failed the character will always be treated as they are brandishing garlic, the if the save is made there is no effect.

—Roast Boar: Save vs. Spells, if failed the character’s Charisma is halved, if the save is made there is no effect.

—Brocoli: Save vs. Spells, if failed then the character may use X-Ray Vision once per week,  if the save is made then there is no effect.

—Red Wine: Duplicates the effects from the module.

4th Course:

—Vanilla Ice Cream with Cherries Jubilee: Save vs. Spells: If fail, the character is affected by a permanent Endure Heat/Cold spell. If succeed then there is no effect.

—Brandy: Duplicates the effects from the module.

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Sword of Light (Mage Spell) (1e)

Sword of Light (Conjuration – Alteration)

  • 7th Level Mage Spell
  • Range: Touch
  • Area of Effect: One Blade
  • Duration: 1 Attack per level of the caster, or two rounds per level of the caster (whichever comes first).
  • Components: VSM
  • Casting Time: 4 Segments

This spell is cast upon the caster’s sword or dagger (commonly the mage’s kris) and increases the base damage by +1d4 per level of the caster, save for half the entire damage rolled. The weapon is treated as a +6 weapon for the purposes of striking creatures only struck by magical weapons  though it gets no actual bonuses to hit, and the caster must still roll to hit with the weapon. Undead and evil spirits take double damage, and creatures struck are also subject to Dismissal as the 5th level Mage spell. In the event that this spell is cast without the material component (the sword or dagger) the duration is halved. Casters who are not Initiates of the Society of Light must roll for Spell Failure as if they were missing a component.

It is commonly found in the Cherev Enoch.

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Master’s Lorica (Mage Spell) (1e)

Master’s Lorica (Enchantment – Alteration)

  • 6th Level Mage Spell
  • Range: None
  • Area of Effect: Self
  • Duration: One day per level.
  • Components: VSM
  • Casting Time: 6 Segments

An advancement and a refinement of the Journeyman’s Hauberk spell, Master’s Lorica as a standby of personal protection and utility, for Master-class mages. It is often considered a far more useful spell than Mantle given it’s simplicity and blanket protections. The spell has the following properties:

    • Grants an Armour Class of 3
      • The bearer is also immune to non-magical weapons.
    • Provides a phantom 12 Hit Points, +2 per level of the caster, that absorbs or ablates damage.
      • If these Phantom Hit Points run out, the spell is dispelled.
      • The bearer may spend 1d4 of these phantom Hit Points toDispel Magicon single enchantment by touch
    • The bearer of the spell benefits from a Protection from Evil enchantment
    • Absorbs Magic Missilesand like eldritch energies
      • This damage “recharges” the phantom hit points granted by the armour at a 2:1 ratio.
    • The bearer of the spell has Fire Resistance as the ring
    • The bearer of the spell has Warmth as the ring
    • The bearer of the spell has Grounding as the ring
    • Grants a +1 to all Saves per four levels of caster
    • Allows the bearer of the spell to Detect Magic by touch
    • Allows the bearer of the spell to Detect Illusion by touch

Much like Journeyman’s Hauberk, the Master’s Lorica requires unalterable material components that is perhaps the sole restriction on use by many mages, and that is 100sp worth each of Diamond, Sapphire, Emerald, and Amethyst Dust is needed for each casting. This requirement cannot be omitted by the mage, its lack spells instant failure. The spell itself produces no visible effect (unlike, say, Phantom Armour) but it’s effects can clearly be seen or perceived by others when they come into play. No other protective spells can be used while this spell is in effect. The spell cannot be Dispelled, nor is it removed by Globes of Invulnerability, and is generally only able to be removed by actual anti-magical effects.

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