Game Play

What is different about My Traveller Universe (aka MTU)

As I start tooling and gearing things up for my resurrected Imperium game using a modified Cephesus Engine, I’ve also had to start to codify some of what makes my setting different from the canon “Official Traveller Universe” (aka the OTU).

MTU and OTU are relatively common terms in the Traveller Grognard community btw.

First, my Imperium is way, way smaller than the canon Third Imperium despite using many or most of the same elements. It’s more like four-ish sectors in size, rather than the… sixteen-ish (???) of canon. I don’t feel like counting, but my size is based on a six-month travel time to the frontier (for Jump-4) and the actually spot my campaign is set is past that, in the equivalent of Honk Kong or Singapore or Macau. Basically on the bleeding edge of the Imperium, it’s six months by fast courier (Jump-6).

Sylea, the capitol of the Imperium, sits on the natural bridge that separates the Greater and Lesser Rifts, controlling a highly strategic location both militarily and economically.

The Ziru Sirkaa (the Restored Grand Empire of Stars) exists, having reconstituted itself during the Long Night after the collapse of the Terran Rule of Man. It is a trade partner and ally of the Imperium, though rivalries certainly exist.

The Imperium is not the most technologically advanced polity. They are simply the most widely and thoroughly developed overall. The Imperium is structured more on Napoleonic England than Classical Rome in many ways

The Solomani Confederation doesn’t exist. Terra and it’s environs is more akin to Middle East, in that is a resource-rich but heavily factionalized and conflict-ridden area with an often lower general technological base.

There is no Zhodani Consulate, instead the Zhodani Transhumans were the last great Imperial geeneering experiment during the Civil War. They fled the Imperium during the Psionic Suppressions and are one of the biggest of Imperial “boogiemen” but continue to fund underground psionic institutes and terrorist organizations inside the Imperium. Their current location is unknown.

Subsectors are 10×10 parsecs, a quadrant is a block of four subsectors, while a sector is four quadrants. Star systems are often somewhat farther apart than in the canon OTU, unlike the “mains” of most maps, though there are often clusters of systems together. Any given subsector might have two clusters of 5-6 systems, with a scatter of another 10-12 systems.

My setting primarily uses Collectors for powering Jump Drives, through for fast travel L-Hyd bladders are commonly used and easy to purchase at A & B starports that have a highport. Military-grade Collectors have the capacity for a “High Intensity” charge that takes only ~24 hours rather than the standard ~168, but carries some risk of damage. There are also a couple of techniques for similar speedy recharges that have related risks.

At least one race (the Sred*Ni) uses a biologically based technology for interstellar travel and Jumps from Gas Giant to Gas Giant. Some highly advanced races have developed much faster hyperspace drives, but the ship size seems to be much more limited. Rumors persist of races that have developed wormhole technology that allows then to essentially “fold space” and allow for instantaneous transport, but these are unproven.

The earliest Jump Drives (at Tech Level 9) are actually slower, rather than a parsec a week, the rate of travel is a parsec a month. This almost automatically involves low berths and cold sleep rather than awake and active crew, and an AI running things. These drives are still quite commonly used because they are cheap and are useful for non-time sensitive materials hauled by bulk freighter.

It’s a definitively “small ship” universe, as Tech Level increases, the ability to create Jump Drives that move larger and larger ships increases – though the Jump speed of ships is limited to the power of the computer installed indexed against the size of the ship. This is a shout-out to Book Two ship construction rules as opposed to Book Five ship construction. The maximum ship size at TL15 is 36,000 dtons, though these are limited to Jump-1.

Ship combat is based on Full Thrust rather than Traveller.

Navies and commercial ships are limited in number, not so much by ship construction requirements but by the psychological and physiological requirements of crewing ships. Simply put, the vast, vast majority of sophonts are not cut out for living in a tin can in space (another reason why travel is uncommon as well), not to mention for the penetration into and translation through Jumpspace. Theories abound regarding biotic fields or “the Traveller gene” but most people need some sort of drugs (or cold sleep) to cope with either or both for extended period of time. This simple fact is what keeps empires from fielding fleets that number in the hundreds or thousands, they simply can’t crew them.

At Tech Level 13, personal shields begin to be developed as an adjunct to contragravity. Useful, though expensive though problematic, they make piloting contragrav vehicles more difficult when active, and problem that is not solved until TL16. They also less efficient against energy rather than kinetic weapons. They are also limited in size due to power ratios, etc, not being able to protect a creature much more mass than a K’Kree.

Artificial Intelligence appears much earlier, starting at around Tech Level 9. The breakthrough at Tech Level 16 is that AI becomes able to Replicate itself with help (and despite hindrance), becoming able to self-propagate through the Datanet.

Cybernetics and augments are much more common than in the OTU, but not anywhere near as common as you would find in a setting like Cyberpunk 2020.

Laser Rifles and Carbines normally use capacitor packs rather than battery backpacks.

Parts of Known Space draw heavily from now decanonized Paranoia Press and Judges Guild source material.

Psionics, while still illegal in the Imperium, are more powerful than in the standard OTU.

TTFN!

D.

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A Gathering of Winds

Wow, with that last post I looked and realized that I’d been keeping up with page that tracked the characters, I hadn’t posted anything to the blog in quite a while. It’s been busy gaming wise and personally (setting up my own office, people switching jobs, some stupid drama with former friends, etc.) so here are the Cliff Notes:

Despite the difficulty of doing so in 5E, we have now managed to lose two characters. The first was Dhagri Trollslayer, the Khazann Barbarian. Through there was lots of political drama involved, ultimately he ate a Kyuss worm, was transformed and had to be put down. KS, the player, replaced him a human Barbarian, a Bear Totem Ancestral Path, and for giggles I also made the character a werebear as a way to give it a power boost (since I brought it in at 3rd level).

The other character that was lost was Lord Devin, one of the most important characters in the group due to his political pull and influence, not to mention his battle prowess. He just died recently, slain by a Dragonborn sorcerer named Ilthane after it transformed into a winged drake that ripped him limb-from-limb. Unfortunately the party simply doesn’t have the resources to bring him back. They can Raise Dead, but due to the damage and the circumstances they’d need a Resurrection. MS has replaced Devin with another human, but this time went with a Gunslinger with a shady background- and seems to be having fun with the new role-playing challenge.

The party has now progressed through the Age of Worms Adventure Path to A Gathering of Winds – which means that they are currently exploring the tomb of Icosiel, one of the Wandering Dukes of Aquaa, and the creator/wielder of the Staff of Law that subsequently exploded during the Battle of Pesh and became the Rod of Seven Parts. They are concerned that Cult of the Ebon Triad is searching for a superweapon of some sort that dates back to the War of Chaos. I am still shaking my head at some of the “it’s a module” moments I have reading the scenarios, and looking at the maps. It’s a great story, but some of the design elements are pretty stupid.

The party is now creeping into Tier 3 play and they can tell, things are getting dangerous, spells can drop people quickly, monsters are tougher, and it’s increasingly clear that they are outstripping the ability of anyone else to help them. I honestly think it is kind of race now to get to 13th/14th level so that they get access to 7th level spells and manage to bump their respective power accordingly. They are also about half-way through the Adventure Path, and things will only ramp up from here. It’s going to be interesting to adapt the various elements of the Path into my campaign world, and I’m looking forward to it.

I switched to story advancement instead of XP quite a while back and I wish I had done it sooner, the whole process is significantly easier and seems much more fluid and reasonable. It also means that the desire to be murder-hobos is greatly lessened because advancement isn’t tied to killing things anymore.

TTFN!

D.

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Alignment, Charisma, and Player Role-Playing Behavior

Your character walks into a bar… how does everyone react?

One of the biggest challenges for DM’s is matching the reactions of NPC’s to the characters in an organic fashion that accurately reflects the character’s behavior, appearance, history, etc.

One cheat is to simply peg things to Charisma and related skills. The problem with this method is that it can quickly get bogged down in reductive dice-rolling and skill checks, not to mention that it often seems to result in dice-rolls that result in utterly inane behavior or responses to the character by NPC’s.

The other cheat is simply to use the player’s roleplaying as a guide. The problem with this of course is that not all players are good at role-playing, plus it paradoxically may ignore a very high or low Charisma or lack of character skill if the player is good enough.

Lastly, there is the age old problem of how Alignment interacts with player/character behavior as well as the above two factors. The classic I’m really a good hero but all I do is act like a murder-hobo is a long-standing issue in the various iterations of D&D.

My own solution is a blend of all three factors, as the title of this post indicates.

Charisma is the easiest to explain, it’s simply how likable or unlikable you are. Honestly. we’ve all know people who do the dumbest, most annoying things but everyone still tends to like them? Or that backstabbing frenemy who you can’t quite get over? This is a class high Charisma person that people just can’t help but make excuses for or other wise like on some ineffable personal level. Similarly, some people are just screwed with having low Charisma and get picked on, aren’t trusted, etc. no matter what they do or say.

Included in this is skills, so if a character is skilled in persuasion or deception or whatever and that is filling up a large period of their time, it is factored in. Basically the idea is to not forget the role that the proficiency bonus might play in people’s reaction to the character.

Alignment, and this works even better in 5e than in 1e, is all about the innate ethics (Law-Chaos axis) and morals (Good-Evil axis) of the character. While certainly providing a rough set of guideposts for the players regarding role-playing behavior (though Palladium did a way better job of that with it’s method), what I use it as is a template for how the character acts while on autopilot and during downtime. The time and events that are role-played are actually quite a small percentage of the character’s life, and alignment provides a good measure as to how they behave the rest of the time sans any specific instruction from the player.

Most people are some version of good, selfish folk are often Chaotic Neutral or Neutral, some honorable but morally aberrant folk are Lawful Evil. Very few people are actually Chaotic or Neutral Evil in human and demi-human society. Interestingly this is, apart from possible Radegastian clothing choices, what makes classically neutral Druids so uncomfortable for many people, they often aren’t operating on “normal” human ethical and moral compasses.

Similarly, as folks age, they tend to become more extreme in their beliefs, moving away from Neutrality. Conversely Mages tend to strip away their ethics and morals in the search for arcane power and are likely to become Neutral (much like Druids but with a supernatural rather than a natural focus).

Character behavior by way of player choice (aka role-playing) is the big wild-card. The previous two elements pretty much run in the background, but role-playing can swing things in any direction. Sufficiently intense or long-term roleplaying can change Alignment (aka, no you can’t continually murder innocent people any stay “good”). Player/Character action can produce huge swings in reaction, especially when it seems grossly out of touch with how people expect the character to behave (aka Alignment). High Charisma can help you get away with things that normally wouldn’t be excused, but do it enough or often enough and people will change those expectations and I, as the game master, will also say that you are also (likely unconsciously) changing you day-to-day behavior to meet whatever that new alignment is.

Now, you can still play good characters tortured by their evil deeds and trying to atone, or evil characters who out of enlightened self-interest perform normally good acts, but those are things to be role-played though player and character action. They are not things that “run in the background” and the player is going to have to make sure that this sort of inner conflict or discrepancy is part of how they role-play because these are things that are part of the inner landscape of the character.

Lastly, it is also worth noting that race, class, and background can also impact things. Some races just have unwholesome reputations just the same as others are considered more upright. Almost every class other than Fighter and every race other than Human (Common Man) comes with some baggage – some good, some bad, and it’s more likely bad than good. And that is speaking merely from a human perspective – talk to the elves and they have an entirely different take on things. Background sets a character into some semblance of social class, and depending upon your game this can have a huge impact on how people react and what assumptions they make – my game is one of those where it does.

Anyways, I hope this gives some folks a more helpful way to negotiate what happens when the character’s in their campaigns walk into a bar…

TTFN!

D.

 

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The Source(s) of Magic

I am now reminded of another key and significant difference between 5e and 1e – where “magic” comes from.

According to 5e, all magic is the same and the different classes merely represent three broad methods for manipulating it – “Divine Magic” merely means that you see the act of manipulating the supernatural in terms of worship or veneration, while “Arcane Magic” means that you see it in terms of a science, while “Mysticism” means you view it as a more of an superpower or inherent ability.

All magic is magic, drawn from the same well. It is what makes the multi-class rules spellcasting rules work, and over all creates a simplified vision of the metaphysics underlying the game universe.

This is fundamentally different from 1e, where Divine Magic, Arcane Magic, and Psionics are quite different things. In 1e, Divine Magic is divine energy or mana that the cleric or druid channeled for their Deity. In fact, in the old nomenclature of Demi-, Lesser, and Greater Gods there were restrictions on the level spell that could be granted based on the power of the Deity – plus the higher level spell were granted (by daily prayer) either by a powerful minion of the Deity or by the Deity Itself.

Arcane Magic in 1e is pretty much like it is described in 5e, the individual caster learns how to manipulate the supernatural energies of magic through the use of formula that involve material, somatic, and verbal components. It’s a science, and the magic-users have learned it, and they are limited merely by their willpower to advance in level.

Psionics in 1e isn’t magic at all, it’s psychic abilities and operated on an entirely different premise.

But all of this just reaffirms the core differences underlying the rules and engine of the game. Now unlike, the Heroic Character of last post which I can totally get behind this “all magic is the same magic, drawn from the same well” is something that I’m not very enamored with. For example, in my old friend SD’s game, clerics were at a disadvantage if they were in an area where there wasn’t any worship of their Deity or there where no shrines or temples in Their Name. It made for an interesting thread in one bit of his campaign.

Currently, I’m experimenting with KR and her Druid/Wizard to allocate her spell levels like 1e instead of 5e. So instead of being a 11th level spell-caster with access to all of those spell-levels (including levels beyond what she can nominally cast save as boosted spells of lower level) we’re trying her out as  5th level caster and a 6th level caster whose spells are tracked separately and cannot “cross pollinate” as it were. It seems like it is working fine and if we don’t find any hidden problems that’s what I’ll stick with.

In any case, that’s my thoughts on the matter,

TTFN!

D.

 

 

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Casting spells and wearing armor (5e)

So, as I go through the list of things that I like about 5e as compared to 1e, and things I like much, much better in 1e the whole concept of wearing armor and casting spells comes up. In 5e, this is simply a matter of proficiency – if you are proficient in the armor, then it doesn’t interfere in your spell-casting. Now, in 1e spell-casting and armor was severely limited and was one of the great balancers for non-human races, fundamentally for Arcane Magic.

Now, truthfully, there are all sorts of different flavors of Arcane Magic now (and we’ll ignore my “historical game” switched all sorts of things up, like Druids using Arcane Magic, blah, blah, blah…) but, in the quest to nerf the idea of level-dipping, and continue to add back at least some of the verisimilitude that made my campaign world make sense…

Divine Magic has no inherent limits on armor (just like 1e), it is simply a matter of the armor training you get from your class. A character Deity is happy to pump divine energy into you, whatever you’re wearing, as long as you’re doing “the right stuff”!

Arcane Magic is where it gets wonky…

Wizards, Eldritch Knights, Arcane Tricksters, and Sorcerers may only wear only wear Ultralight Armor.

Bards and Warlocks may wear Ultralight and Light Armor.

Elves, High Men, Half-Elves, Sh’dai, Dwarrow, the Old Race, and Gnomes (this could expand as additional races are detailed) may wear non-metallic Light and Medium Armor and cast Arcane Magic, they may also wear enchanted metallic armor of the same types.

This gets us back to the image of locking wizards into specially-made suits of armor as a way to neutralize them without having to cut their tongues out or cut off their fingers and hands… It’s also the reason why these races are likely to get targeted first by tactically knowledgeable opponents, they are going to be assumed to be spell-casters, no matter what they actually are, and are perceived as mysterious, dangerous, and the most significant threat sans any more obvious target.

D.

 

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Death and the Player Character (5E DnD)

So, as I study for the EPPP, part of my brain recovery (or cushioning more likely) has been watching Matthew Colville’s Running the Game series and the odd video or three from Web DM. I strongly recommend both sets of videos, for a variety of reasons – you can decide on your own. Now, that said, this has more to do with the recent release of Matt Mercer’s Resurrection rules from Critical Whatever. I don’t watch it, but the rules came across my feed.

It force me to think about this in my game, as well as reflecting on some of the differences between 1E and 5E. In the old 1E games, things were much more lethal, and characters were a bit more careful as result. In 5E, healing is much more available, dying is much harder (mechanically), and there are none of the limitations or costs on Raising that previously existed (System Shocks, Con loss, racial limitations). We are finally at the level where Raise Dead is available (or will be soon) and while I like the idea of Matt Mercer’s rules they are just way to fiddly in some ways. 5E DnD has done a lot to get rid of fiddly in some ways and his rules actually seem more fiddly than 1E AD&D was.

I’ve also been thinking about simply how easy it is to bring back people from death or it’s brink in 5E. I like this flavor to tell the truth, but the Gentle Repose and Revivify combo is a, um, “killer” on top of the normal magical curing, healing kits, and Spare the Dying cantrip. It is really pretty darn hard to die and they’ve made it pretty darn easy to come back from it…

Perhaps too easy for my evolved campaign setting.

Now, one suggestion is to make diamonds (the material component for Revivify, Raise Dead, Resurrection, and True Resurrection) much less common and very difficult to find. Truthfully, I already know exactly had rare they are and they already aren’t that common. But I also don’t exactly mind Revivify given the time limitations involved. I do miss the System Shock rolls of the old Raise Dead spells, as well as the racial limitations – these are huge social and cultural limiting factors in my campaign.

Note, this is also all in my search to re-humanize my world a bit. It is intended to be humanocentric world, and there is no mechanical reason for this in 5E unlike the reasons why this would be in 1E.

So, normal rules of dealing with near death still apply. Dropping to 0HP is just like the rules. Healing from that works as normal and Revivify works as normal. A Saving Throw on the part of the character being brought back from death is required for Gentle Repose + Revivify, Raise Dead, and Resurrection. There is no Saving Throw needed for True Resurrection or Reincarnate. For purposes of effects, any time you are Revivified outside of the base timing of the spell because of some other spell or magic item in the mix, you need to make the Ability Check.

The ability that the Ability Check is rolled on is chosen by the player of the character being brought back as long as they can justify it. The Ability Check is Medium (15), using Bywater-grade diamonds (basically industrial quality) incurs Disadvantage, while 1st Water diamonds grant Advantage. For what it is worth, Bywater is pretty much all that is available in Towns (and probably only enough for one casting of Revivify) while 2nd and 3rd Water are available Cities, and 1st Water diamonds are generally only available (at normal price) in Great Cities.

Things that normally affect Ability Checks will also affect this one – meaning that a group of companions pleading with their deities, cleansing the area spiritually, calling out psychically to help the spirit find it’s way to the body, whatever, can potentially help this roll (see p175 “Working Together” in the Player’s Handbook).

Jewelry with an appropriately-sized diamond in it is very “fashionable” for many adventurers and usually able to be found in most cities.

In the realm of verisimilitude and Gygaxian Naturalism, these sorts of spells also incurs a significant bit of interest in a divine caster’s deity, even if unconscious. So bringing character back from death that do not worship the same deity, are of significant different alignments, etc., etc., etc. can have significant repercussions for everyone involved. Geasa, religious conversion, spell refusal/failure, and the like are all possible and should be expected. This is beyond how some cultures and races view and deal with death. For example, Dwarves can be Raised, but culturally are loath to come back and see it as a curse rather than a blessing. There is also, invariably, some other cost to coming back from the dead – ability score penalty, insanity, whatever. It really depends upon the situation and context – hacked to death by swords is a bit more traumatic than a quiet backstab that killed someone instantly, but assume that dying is troubling to the emotional well-being of a character and even their spiritual health.

I’m slowly updating the write-ups of the character races with their relationship with death.

TTFN!

D.

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A Letter to Frater Nikolai

Nikolai,

I trust this letter finds you well and that you have found what you needed during your time spent in contemplation. I wish that I could say that that I am sorry to be writing you, and in one way I am for I would not bother you unless there was the direst need for both your dedication and your skills. At the same time, I must admit that I happy that you will be actively bringing the Light to the world once again.

A situation in the Kingdom of Llyr has come up that requires your special insights as I am sure the following letter will explain.

You may have heard, even in your isolation of the young Lord Devin Tresendar? Well, the rumors are true, he is Touched by the Lord Sc. Michael and has been blessed with a series of miracles as he brings Light in Darkness. He and his companions have even travelled to the Shadowlands in the pursuit of a series of threads regarding a prophecy of an upcoming Age of Worms – I have arranged to have more details gathered and awaiting for you upon your arrival and this is perhaps the greatest reason for choosing you to attend to this matter.

Fighting against the Vanguard of Sertrous which seeks to bring about this coming Age, Tresendar confronted them and thwarted their plan to summon forth their long-dead commander. If this was not miracle enough he recovered the great sword Merthuvial, the Kingmaker, and confirmed as its rightful wielder.

Returning home, it became become apparent that there is old rot within the lands of his family and Tresendar discovered a cult deeply entrenched in fabric of Diamond Lake, a prominent mining town of the kingdom, and one that was part of his family lands for generations – though mismanagement and misfortune had passed control to the Consortium in his grandfather’s time. Investigating and striking quickly, Tresendar and his companions discovered a long buried fane – one older than anything that you can imagine or even guess.

Our aid was requested by Tresendar to deal with the guardianship of the fane, so I have arranged for a company of troops to be at your disposal, under your good Watch and Judgement. I also think that Lord Tresendar would benefit from some advice and counsel, as well as he has done so far he is surrounded by a curious set of companions – please see the attached letter for details.

But, the Community of the town has not only lost its leader, it has seemingly lost its way as well. The former Lightbringer of the town, one Jierian Wierus, was a fanatic and by all reports unhinged. Perhaps it was the dire influence of the cult or the close proximity of the fane, or perhaps he was simply weak, but in any case he has left the community there in dire straits with his death in the fane. While many in the town are of the Faith, the recent events have shaken them and it is important that they know that the Church has not forgotten them.

Also, given the chaos involved in the discovery of the cult, the entire leadership of the town itself is uncertain. I have dispatched this letter before word has come from the King as to how he is handling the disposal of the town.

I will commit no more to paper on this subject my friend. You must witness it for yourself. Grace in Light, Strength in Darkness.

 

Sancta Loren

The Most Reverend Gregorius Sc. Thiede, by the Lords of Light and Proclamation of the Sarim under the Lord Sc. Metatron, Lord High Archon and Primate of the Rite of the Congregation of Loren.

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Pushing Rolls in 7E

So I was listening to the Chaosium Call of Cthulhu panel from GenCon and they had a really interesting insight into the “pushing rolls” mechanic from 7E.

Mechanically, for non-combat rolls only, players have the option to “push a roll” when they fail the initial attempt. The player has to justify how they either continue the first attempt or get a second try, but the penalty is that if the pushed attempt fails then something bad happens.

The panel pointed out that the “something bad” was a method to “increase the horror” not merely inflict a failure or a fumble.

I really like this as it actually makes it even easier to understand the mechanic, and gives me (the Keeper) an easier tool to make this specific to individual Investigators.

D.

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What’s happening!?!

So, we are on a bit of a break from the D&D 5e Siyahchal Campaign, the characters have liberated the town of Diamond Lake from it’s corrupt mayor and the worst of the mine owners as part of the process of dealing with the Cult of the Ebon Triad. Devin has been installed as a Baronet with responsibility for the town and much of the surrounding area. We’ll pick things up again in a couple of months “real-time” and a year or two “game time” when the stars shift again, threatening an Age of Worms…

In the meantime we are playing Call of Cthulhu 7e, and Pulp Cthulhu at that. One player is taking a break (Cthulhu really not being her thing) but everyone else jumped at the idea of this system. I’m setting the game in Chicago, starting it in 1920, and continuing on somewhat from where I left the small campaign set in wartime Paris that I was playing with MR and KT. I’ve combined the classic Haunting scenario and the more recent Edge of Darkness scenario into one larger, interlinked narrative.

We’ve played one session and everyone seemed to have fun, I’ll do what I can to keep people abreast with what is happening. You can follow thin links above and see what characters people have, and while I have modified the traits for Pulp Cthulhu somewhat (and I’ll post my changes here in the next week or so), the “double hit points” and extra rules for luck makes a good start to a more survivable game.

TTFN!

D.

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As a bit of a place-marker…

When I’m floating a new campaign, especially a new system, I like to be able to reference movies or TV shows for the players so that can get at least some sense of what I’m thinking about. That being the case for my current gaming group, here’s what the primary visual media that I’d watch to get a flavor of the game…

For a Traveller game:

Jupiter Ascending, Battlestar Galactica (SyFy TV Show), Firefly (TV Show) and Serenity, The Expanse (TV Show), Sharpe’s Rifles (TV Show), Avatar, The Fifth Element, the Chronicles of Riddick, Babylon 5 and associated media (TV Show), Dune and Children of Dune (SyFy Series), and the original Star Wars trilogy some elements of Star Trek.

For a Cyberpunk 2020 game it would be:

Bladerunner, the Alien movies, the Predator movies, Escape From New York/LA, Soldier, Stargate, the Andromeda Strain, Outland, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Handmaid’s Tale, Equilibrium, the Matrix series, Max Payne, Dredd, Children of Men, the Terminator series (Film and TV), the Resident Evil series, Ultraviolet, Lucy, La Femme Nikita (Film and TV Show), Sleeping Beauty, Tron and Tron:Legacy, Minority Report, A Clockwork Orange,

For a Call of Cthulhu game:

John Carpenter’s The Thing, The Dunwich Horror, From Beyond, The Unnamable, the Reanimator series, The Mummy and The Mummy Returns, The Wolfman (2010), Penny Dreadful (Showtime series), Brotherhood of the WolfSalem’s Lot, The Keep, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Martyrs, We Are What We Are, the Indiana Jones films, The Witch, Crimson Peak, Angelheart, Dagon, Starry Eyes, The Exorcist, The Howling, American Werewolf In London, Angelheart, The Fog, The Changeling, Rosemary’s Baby, The Shining,

A more modern Delta Green game would also include:

Crimson Rivers and Crimson Rivers: Angels of the Apocalypse, Threshhold (TV Show), the Blade series, Altered States, X-Files (TV Show), Hannibal (TV Show), Jekyll (TV Show), the Bourne series, True Detective (1st Season HBO), The Wicker Man, The Omen, the Hellraiser series, Blair Witch Project, The Ring, the Hostel series, 8mm, The Objective, Apocalypse Now, It Follows, [Rec],

And finally, the “Modern Occult” game (used to be Mage, now probably Witchcraft) would include the above but also be slanted towards:

Dresden Files (TV Show), Person of Interest (TV Show), The Magicians (TV Show), The Last Witch Hunter, the Hellboy movies, Pan’s Labyrinth, Byzantium, 30 Days of Night, Let The Right One In, Supernatural (TV Series), Ginger Snaps, Cat People,

I am certain that I have missed a whole series of films or TV shows, but this was a quick and dirty “off the top of my head” listing of things. I suppose I’ll update things as I remember or come across them.D.

 

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